Interview with Author Douglas Brown

You can read up more on Douglas Brown at his blog (here)

Douglas R. Brown is a fantasy writer living in Pataskala, Ohio. He began writing over five years ago as a cathartic way of dealing with the day-to-day stresses of life as a firefighter/paramedic in Colubus, Ohio. Now he focuses his writing on fantasy where he can draw from his lifelong love of the genre. He has been married for 15 years with a son and two dogs.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

Tamed cover copy
Werewolves are real.
And they make excellent pets.
Owning one of the legendary creatures is the latest
fad. The WereHouse insists werepets are loyal, docile, and 100% safe, but what
happens when these gentle giants turn on their masters?
While on a routine EMS call, paramedic Christine Alt
is attacked by a rogue werepet. She escapes with her life, but the encounter
leaves her with more than just scars. As her body begins to change, she
discovers the WereHouse is hiding a terrible secret, and they will stop at
nothing to keep her from exposing them.
Tamed
is a werewolf tale with a twist from the author of the The Light of Epertase trilogy.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~`~

 1.      What made you want to
start writing?
     I wrote as a teen-ager
because I felt the nagging need to express some measure of creativity and I found
that I wasn’t too terrible at telling stories. When I became a firefighter, I
stopped writing as my life went in a different direction. After nearly 20 years
of not writing, I had an emergency call that affected me deeply. (Read about it
here. Afterward,
I decided to write about that call. In doing so, I rediscovered my love of
writing and when I finished, I decided to write something as far away from real
life as possible, which is why I went to fantasy.
2.        How do
you get the ideas for your characters?
    
     Good question. My
characters kind of create themselves usually. If I need an old farmer for a
scene, I craft a character by what the needs in that scene are. As that
character becomes more involved in the story, he/she evolves into a
well-rounded creation (hopefully).
3.        What
makes your characters stand out?
    
     Their emotional
reactions to terrible events. My job helps me in that department. I like to
think that my characters are well rounded and have something that engages the
reader. Whether that character is good or evil, I hope the reader has some kind
of emotional reaction when they read about them.
4.        Which of
your books was the most fun for you to write?
     The Light of Epertase, Book One: Legends Reborn. That’s an easy
answer for me because my first book (about the fire department) was a hard,
depressing book to write. Whereas Epertase was written simply because it was a
story I wanted to write. There were no deadlines, no expectations, nothing. I
am currently writing Epertase 3 and it is difficult because now I have
deadlines and though it is the story I want to tell, it is no longer just for
fun.
5.        Was it
hard to get a signed contract for your books?
     Yes. I spent nearly 1
1/2 years searching for an agent or publisher. In fact, I wrote most of Tamed during that process. Rejections
are tough, but no-replies are even tougher.
6.        How do
you like living in Ohio?
     Well, since it is about
17 degrees as I type this, I’d say not too much. Seriously, overall Ohio is
alright. There’s a saying here. If you don’t like the temperature today, just
wait until tomorrow. The temperature changes drastically sometimes day-to-day.
Last week, I washed my car because it was so nice out.
7.        What is
your favorite place to write?
     In my movie theater
room. It is quiet and it is in my basement so there are no distractions.
8.        Do you
relate any real life experiences into your books?
     Absolutely. As a
firefighter/paramedic I have seen people at their very worse and in my
coworkers, people at their best. If I write a scene with someone getting
injured, or having a life changing event, or whatever, I know how people react
in those situations because I’ve seen it.
9.        Do you
read?
     Yes. But not as much as
I should nowadays.
10.    What are your favorite type
of books and Authors to read?
     I love non-fiction. When
I’m not reading fantasy or Stephen King, I’m reading about Steve Jobs, the CIA,
or some other nonfiction story.
11.    Would you consider reading
new authors?
     It’s tough because I
talk with new authors quite often and I would love to be able to read all of
their stuff. I just don’t have time like I’d like to have. Plus, Rhemalda is a
little bit like a family. Right now, any new writers I find myself reading are
usually new with Rhemalda. We kind of share each others’ books on occasion and
I’m about six books behind.
12.    If you could go anywhere in
the world where would you go?
     I’m pretty boring. My
favorite trip is taking my son to Disney. That’s what I’m doing again this year
and I can’t wait. I don’t have much interest in leaving the country. I would
like to go to Hawaii, I guess. (And yes, I know Hawaii is part of the country
but I think you know what I mean.)
13.    If you could spend the day
with someone who would it be? (dead or alive)
     Alive-Trent Reznor,
Howard Stern, or Stephen King. Although, if I wasn’t married, I think Megan Fox
would be wonderful company.
     Dead- One of our
founding fathers. I’d love to know what their intentions were when compared to
today’s world. I don’t imagine they foresaw the problems that plague our
country today. Or maybe they did and how we interpret what they meant is wrong.
14.   What other hobbies do you have?
     I mostly write as a
hobby when I’m not working or spending time with my family. I love watching
sports, so that could be a hobby, but I’m getting too old to play them much
anymore. Heck, I’ve thrown out my back just getting out of bed.
15.   What advice would you give to others wanting to become authors?
     Don’t write to be
published. Write because it is your passion and while you are trying to snag an
agent or publisher, keep writing. Remember, not getting a publishing deal
doesn’t mean you aren’t a good writer. It just means the right publisher/agent
hasn’t come across your work yet. It’s luck created by hard work.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s